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Archive for May, 2012

“I HAVE A DREAM” | GROUP WORK | CONCORDANCE | ANTCONC

BY NATASHA,SYAKILLA,AISYAH

FREQUENCY

The phrase ‘I have a dream’ frequency: 8 hits

Next, these are the phrases that contain “I have a dream” phrase that we edit by using the online picture editor,PIZAP.

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Anaphora

Anaphora (repeating words at the beginning of neigbouring clauses) is a commonly used rhetorical device. Repeating the word twice sets the pattern, and further repetitions emphasize the pattern and increase the rethorical effect. ‘I have a dream’ is repeated in eight successive sentences, and is one of the most often cited examples of anaphora in modern rethoric. For example, Martin Luther King Jr. emphasizes the phrases by repeating at the beginning of sentences.

Methapor

Metaphors allow you to associate your speech concepts with concrete images and emotions.To highlight the contrast between two abstract concepts, consider associating them with contrasting concrete metaphors. For example, Martin Lurther King Jr. use the word ‘dream’ as a frame for the future and sets the stage of the rest of the words.

Source: http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/speech-analysis-dream-martin-luther-king/

Report: From the speech’s text of Martin Luther King Jr. we find that  he uses the Anaphora and Methapor as the manner of speech. Anaphor; he keeps repeating the same phrase, which is I have a dream, in order to emphasize his  intention to change  the rule of the country so that the transformation will succeed. Methapor; in his speech, he uses the word ‘dream’ to replace his real hope or intention to make the citizen more concern about the future.

Meaning

 I have a dream that one day The dream is a frame for the   future and sets the stage for the rest of the words. ‘Dream’ is vague aspiration. ‘one day’ starts to make it specific.
 I have a dream that one day on      the red hills of Georgia Repeating the ‘dream’, hammering home the hope for the future.’red’ hints at blood, implying pain, struggle and injustice. Georgia symbolizes the South.
 I have a dream that one day  even the state of Mississippi, Repeating the ‘dream’ phrase again to complete a triple.’even’ implies that Mississippi is one of the worst examples of racism. Yet this, too, is included in the dream.’state’ points at the formal State organization, noting that racism is institutionalized there.
 I have a dream that my four children The dream metaphor again. Now it is turning from a triple into a theme.Children are always evocative. ‘my’ makes it personal to King and hence also personal to everyone listening.
 I have a dream today! Ending as beginning, bracketing the whole paragraph.Note that this is said on a rising upswing, not as a declining completion.
 I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, The dream metaphor again. Alabama is mentioned because of its sadistic racists.
 I have a dream today! Ending as beginning, bracketing the whole paragraph.Note that this is said on a rising upswing, not as a declining completion.
 I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, The dream metaphor again. He means about ‘every valley shall be exalted’ is about changes and need to be equal.

Source: http://changingminds.org/analysis/i_have_a_dream.htm

Report: Every phrase that he keeps mentioning gave different meanings. It has its own meaning. So, I conclude that,all;

>he wants that everybody should be treat fair and all he wants is justice.

>he wants that all citizen to stick together and have a kinship environment.

>he wants that the country is free from oppression.

>he wants the citizen to stop being racist.

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WORD LIST | ANTCONC

ImageBy using the Antconc application software, I have found ten most frequent words in I have a dream speech text with just clicking the item ‘word list’ and ‘start’. I am just focusing on nouns.

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RANKING

WORD

FREQUENCY

12

freedom

20

19

Negro

14

23

day

12

24

ring

12

26

dream

11

27

nation

11

39

justice

8

45

together

7

49

men

6

50

white

6

FREEDOM

“I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for (1)freedom  in the history of our nation.”

“And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of (2)freedom and the security of justice.”

“This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of (3)freedom and equality.”

“Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for (4)freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.”

“And they have come to realize that their (5)freedom is inextricably bound to our (6)freedom. We cannot walk alone.”

“And some of you have come from areas where your quest — quest for (7)freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality.”

“With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for (8)freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.”

“And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning: My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride. From every mountainside, let (9)freedom ring!”

“And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. And so let (10)freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let (11)freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let (12)freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.”

“Let (13)freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado!”

“Let (14)freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!”

“But not only that: Let (15)freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!”

“Let (17)freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!”

“Let (18)freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let (19)freedom ring.”

“And when this happens, when we allow (20)freedom ring, ..”

NEGRO

“This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of (1)Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice.”

“But one hundred years later, the (2)Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the (3)Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the (4)Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the (5)Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.”

“..America has given the (6)Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.”

“This sweltering summer of the (7)Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the (8)Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquillity in America until the (9)Negro is granted his citizenship rights.”

“The marvellous new militancy which has engulfed the (10)Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people,.”

“We can never be satisfied as long as the (11)Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. *We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by a sign stating: “For Whites Only.”* We cannot be satisfied as long as a (12)Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a (13)Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

“..sing in the words of the old (14)Negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last!”

DAY

“The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright (1)day of justice emerges.”

“I have a dream that one (2)day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

“I have a dream that one (3)day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

“I have a dream that one (4)day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”

“I have a dream that one (5)day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.”

“I have a dream that my four little children will one (6)day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

“I have a dream that one (7)day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one (8)day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

“I have a dream that one (9)day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”

“With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one (10)day.”

“And this will be the (11)day — this will be the (12)day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning: My country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride. From every mountainside, let freedom ring!”

RING

“From every mountainside, let freedom (1)ring!”

“And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. And so let freedom (2)ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom (3)ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom (4)ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.”

“Let freedom (5)ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado!”

“Let freedom (6)ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!”

“But not only that: Let freedom (7)ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!”

“Let freedom (8)ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!”

“Let freedom (9)ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom (10)ring.”

“And when this happens, when we allow freedom (11)ring, when we let it (12)ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last!”

DREAM

“I still have a (1)dream. It is a (2)dream deeply rooted in the American (3)dream.”

“I have a (4)dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

“I have a (5)dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”

“I have a (6)dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.”

“I have a (7)dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

“I have a (8)dream today!”

“I have a (9)dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

“I have a (10)dream today!”

“I have a (11)dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.”

NATION

“I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our (1)nation.”

“In a sense we’ve come to our (2)nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.”

“We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this (3)nation.”

“Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our (4)nation from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.”

“It would be fatal for the (5)nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the (6)nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquillity in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our (7)nation until the bright day of justice emerges.”

“I have a dream that one day this (8)nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a (9)nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

“With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our (10)nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.”

“And if America is to be a great (11)nation, this must become true. And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.”

JUSTICE

“But we refuse to believe that the bank of (1)justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we’ve come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of (2)justice.”

“Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial (3)justice.”

“Now is the time to make (4)justice a reality for all of God’s children.”

“The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of (5)justice emerges.”

“But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of (6)justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds.”

“No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until “(7)justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

“I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and (8)justice.”

TOGETHER

“I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down (1)together at the table of brotherhood.”

“I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; “and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it (2)together.”

“This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work (3)together, to pray (4)together, to struggle (5)together, to go to jail (6)together, to stand up for freedom (7)together, knowing that we will be free one day.”

MEN

“This note was a promise that all (1)men, yes, black (2)men as well as white (3)men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all (4)men are created equal.”

“And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black (5)men and white (6)men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last!”

WHITE

“This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as (1)white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

“The marvellous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all (2)white people, for many of our (3)white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny.”

“I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of “interposition” and “nullification” — one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little (4)white boys and (5)white girls as sisters and brothers.”

“And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and (6)white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last!”

ANTCONC | CONCORDANCE

Assalamualaikum .. hyehye dear readers,  i believe u guys are wondering what is antconc ? and what is concordance ?

Antconc

    Antconc, is actually a freeware concordance program for Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux.

It is a multiplatform tool for carrying out corpus linguistics research and data‐driven learning.

If u want to know every functioning tools in Antconc, check out this link :

    http://www.antlab.sci.waseda.ac.jp/software/README_AntConc3.2.4.pdf

where can you get  Antconc ?

                  click here : http://www.antlab.sci.waseda.ac.jp/software.html

What is concordance?

 Concordance , according to linguists concordance is a  form of cross-reference between different parts of a sentence or phrase.

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Now, I’m going to show how to use antconc. Trust me, this tutorial is simple. Just follow all of these steps :

STEP 1 

*make sure  you have download it. 🙂

Open the file antconc3.0.1.exe.                            

STEP 2 

Click on “file, open.”

STEP 3

In this example, I have opened a corpus text file called “ihad.txt” by double clicking on the file. The file name appears in the left-hand window. *Corpus, is a long-text file that used in antconc to analyze it.

In my case, I was assigned to analyze the speech of Martin Luther King Jr.  entitled I Have a Dream. As pronounced to the march on Washington, DC, 28 August 1963. So, his speech is my corpus that will be used in antconc.

here are the links for his speech :

Part 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wQQyIj-wDyg

Part 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_1zxq0TCjIg

STEP 4

You may start your analysis on any items whether it’s Concordance, Concordance Plot, File View, Clusters, Collocates, Word List, and Keyword List.

 STEP 5

After I choose the items,I keyed “enter” on my keyboard to build the concordance , word list or another items. (You can also click on “start.”)

THAT’S ALL. easy, isn’t? So now, lets work it out. ^^ HWAITING !!

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